cupofteaorgtfo:

Better get my shit packed for Hogwarts the train leaves tomorrow

How manipulative is Margaery? Is it all about playing the angles or is there like, some deep heart in there, too? What’s her motivation? (x)

kernezelda:

mcabender-fassavoy-mcfassy:

After each of these times saying Erik’s name, whether with anticipation or worry or exasperation or horror, Charles goes after him and stays with him.

The thing is, Charles thinks of them as partners in all of this, everything that’s going on, but Erik’s still working the same way he did all those years on his own, making these solitary decision and acting immediately, no discussion or compromise or acknowledgement involved in it. At the end of the movie, he wants Charles by his side, but I don’t think he really knows what that means

#I’m not crying YOU are

Oh, stupid boys. *is not crying*

disneymoviesandfacts:

When the adults’ swearing got out of hand on the set of The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and The WardrobeGeorgie Henley set up a swear bucket. James McAvoy was supposedly the worst offender. Even her teenager co-stars had to pay their toll, though, especially Skandar Keynes, accordingly to DVD’s commentary.

based on this post

disneymoviesandfacts:

Georgie Henley's (Lucy) reaction to Mr. Tumnus at the lamppost in The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe is genuine. She had not seen her cast mate James McAvoy in his costume before the scene was filmed, so her screams and reaction were real. Georgie’s first reaction to the snowy world of Narnia is also genuine - she was carried into the set blindfolded to make her first entrance, and her wide-eyed, delighted reactions to it all are entirely her own.

ilovedeansamcass:

grimdarkfallenangelinatardis:

The longer you watch the more childish they get

I love them

aausten